‘The Myth of Sisyphus’ by Albert Camus and The Legend of Oedipus

Fulchran-Jean Harriet (1778–1805), French. Oedipus at Colonus, 1798. Oil on canvas, 157 × 134 cm. The Cleveland Museum of Art. Mr and Mrs. William H. Marlatt Fund, 2002.3.

“I conclude that all is well,” says Oedipus, and that remark is sacred. It echoes in the wild and limited universe of man. It teaches that all is not, has not been, exhausted. It drives out of this world a god who had come into it with dissatisfaction and a preference for futile sufferings. It makes of fate a human matter, which must be settled among men.

Column @ timetravelnexus.com on iconic books, TV shows/films: Time Travel Peregrinations. Reviewed all episodes of ‘Dark’ @ site. https://linktr.ee/marcbarham64

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Marc Barham

Marc Barham

Column @ timetravelnexus.com on iconic books, TV shows/films: Time Travel Peregrinations. Reviewed all episodes of ‘Dark’ @ site. https://linktr.ee/marcbarham64

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